LEDFORD & ASSOCIATES

MICHIGAN LAW IN THE NEWS

Tags: US Supreme Court

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Sooner Or Later, The Supreme Court Will Be Forced To Decide The Tax Future Of 2 Million Workers

With as many as seven in 10 Americans saying they will work from home at least part of the time going forward - which state gets to tax that income is a thorny question

Read more at Forbes

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New Supreme Court Case Could Drastically Limit Homeowners Fourth Amendment Rights

Case coming before the U.S. Supreme Court touching on unreasonable searches and seizures. I *hope* they act to protect privacy and liberty against an ever expanding power of government to intrude. If they do not act to protect individual liberties...

"Thanks to overcriminalization, prosecutors could potentially file far more criminal charges over “a staggering array of everyday conduct,” including “doodling on a dollar bill, selling snacks without a license, spitting in public, eavesdropping, littering (including on your own property), jaywalking, and possession of a felt tip marker by a person under twenty-one.” As a result, “millions of Americans unwittingly commit a misdemeanor every day.”

“Uncontrolled search and seizure is one of the first and most effective weapons in the arsenal of every arbitrary government,” Justice Robert H. Jackson warned more than seven decades ago. “Among deprivations of rights, none is so effective in cowing a population, crushing the spirit of the individual and putting terror in every heart...the human personality deteriorates and dignity and self-reliance disappear where homes, persons and possessions are subject at any hour to unheralded search and seizure by the police.”

Read more at Forbes

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More than half of Michigan juvenile lifers still wait for resentencing

Nearly 200 inmates are waiting for a judicial review.

Three years after SCOTUS ruled that juvenile lifers should have the chance to come home, 55% in Michigan are still waiting to go before a judge.
Read more at Detroit Free Press
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Supreme Court rules 'crime of violence' law is unconstitutionally vague

A divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that a federal law requiring longer prison sentences for using a gun during a "crime of violence" is unconstitutionally vague.

The court voted 5-4 stating the law "provides no reliable way" to determine which offenses qualify as crimes of violence.
The case presented to the Supreme Court involved two men -- Maurice Davis and Andre Glover -- who were convicted of several robbery charges and another federal statute that required increased mandatory minimum sentences for a "crime of violence."
Read more at UPI
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Supreme Court Rules That 'Scandalous' and 'Immoral' Names Can Be Trademarked

In a 6-3 ruling decided Monday, the Supreme Court struck down the Patent and Trademark Office’s (PTO) ban on “immoral” or “scandalous” trademarks, calling it a violation of free speech

The ruling was decided by a mix of liberal and conservative justices. Kagan, Justice Clarence Thomas, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Justice Samuel Alito, Justice Neil Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh all voted in favor.
Read more at Time.com
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