LEDFORD & ASSOCIATES

MICHIGAN LAW IN THE NEWS

Tags: Marijuana

Description:

Paul

Michigan Law Enforcement Agencies Start Using Roadside Drug Testing Equipment

More than 50 law enforcement agencies across the state are testing roadside drug detection equipment.

This tool is currently being used by Cadillac City Police.
It can detect marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamine, opiates and some drugs considered “tranquilizers”.
Read more at 9&10 News
Paul

Rules murky on Opportunity Zones for cannabis businesses

Generally speaking, legal experts agree that Opportunity Zone funding cannot directly fund a marijuana operation because cannabis is still an illegal Schedule I narcotic.

That has left the legal community to date trying to determine how precisely the new federal tax incentive program can be deployed now that both recreational and medical marijuana are legal in Michigan.
Read more at Crains Detroit Business
Paul

A beginner’s guide to legal marijuana in Michigan

Consuming marijuana is limited to private places -- like your home or a friend’s home. It’s not legal to consume marijuana in your car -- even if you are a passenger -- or in public.

When sales do launch at retail stores, there will be a large variety of products to choose from. From the marijuana flower that you smoke to pre-rolled joints to vape cartridges, there are a number of ways to consume marijuana.
Read more at mLive.com
Paul

AG Dana Nessel eyes tweaks to recreational marijuana law

Some of the infractions have no clear penalties in the current law

Any changes the workgroup comes up with are going to face a hurdle. To change a citizen-initiated law requires a three-fourths vote of the legislature, instead of the normal majority vote. On some pieces, Nessel said, that three-fourths vote is going to be unavoidable, and it’s hard to do..
Read more at mLive.com
Paul

235K people could have their records expunged of marijuana charges

The "proposed law also directs courts to grant expungements in cases where a person was convicted for possessing an amount of marijuana that is now legally allowed. It also expands the types of crimes that people could seek expungement for, including convictions for growing or possessing with the intent to distribute."

More than 235,000 people could have their criminal records automatically cleared of low-level marijuana crimes under a bill set to be introduced in the Michigan Senate.
Read more at mLive.com